Single Reviews

Single Review: Matt Rogers - "Thunderbird"

  

 

                                                                      MATT ROGERS

                                                               "Thunderbird" 

                                                               Independent Release

 

 

 

 

Over his last few releases, “Be Like Him,” “Fallout,” and now “Thunderbird,” Matt Rogers has really started to establish himself as one of country music’s newest artists that we need to be keeping an eye on. His rich vocals wrap around lyrics that hold deep emotions and strongly connect with the listener, whether they’re geared towards heartbreak, trust, or in the case of “Thunderbird,” the life lessons we learn from dad and pass down through generations.

“Thunderbird,” co-written by Rogers and Heath Deloach, is built for today’s top 40, but it also carries a strong throwback feel to the late 2000’s era that adds a splash of old school freshness to it while still maintaining it’s relevance with what is going on today.

With a guitar lick through the intro that instantly perks your ears and makes you invest in the song with interest, Rogers than wraps his vocals around a nostalgic lyric that will instantly transport you back in time to when you and dad were in the garage together having those father/son moments.

The opening lines describe the “Thunderbird” as being up on blocks when he first got her, four different colors, and having its parts in a box. However, midway through the opening verse Rogers starts to shift toward what his dad taught him when he was younger and they’d be working on the car together; how to fetch a socket wrench, 14 different ways to say son of a, and which way to hold the flashlight.

The second verse follows suit with the first, but Rogers advances the story forward as he talks about how the car is now starting to come together and touches on those “don’t tell this to your mother” moments that all fathers and sons experience when he sings, “If mama wasn’t with us, we were sideways through the bends.”

However, this song is not about a car at all. It’s about those deeper lessons that we learn through these bonding moments that stick with us, shape who we become, and that we then pass on to our own children. Moments that Rogers sings about in the chorus: 

“Don’t start something that you can’t finish.

And when your wrong you stand up and admit it.

If you ain’t got time to do it right

You sure ain’t got time to do it twice.”

Matt Rogers is creating major buzz right now, and with songs like “Thunderbird” it’s very easy to see why. Though all of us may not have learned them while working on a car in the garage, this type of song is ultra-relatable to anyone as we’ve all learned these types of lessons from our parents in some way, shape, or form and carry them within us today.

(Review Written By: Jeffrey Kurtis)